Category: Section 475 MTM

Traders Elect 475 For Enormous Tax Savings (Live Updates)

May 20, 2020 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA | Read it on

Updates

May 20: 2019 calendar-year partnership and S-Corp tax returns, and 2020 Section 475 elections for partnerships and S-Corps, were due March 16, 2020. These pass-through tax returns and entity 475 elections are not eligible for virus tax relief with the July 15, 2020 postponement deadline. Postponement relief is limited to 2019 tax returns due April 1, 2020, or after, and the March 16 deadline was before April 1. However, fiscal-year partnership or S-Corp tax returns due on April 1, 2020, or later are eligible for the July 15 deadline.

Traders have calendar-year partnerships and S-Corps, so these entities are not eligible for the July 15 postponement date. Most traders filed 2019 partnership or S-Corp extensions by March 16, some along with 2020 Section 475 elections for the entity. Some of these traders asked our firm if their entity could take advantage of the postponed deadline for making a Section 475 MTM election. The answer is no. Individual traders (sole proprietors) are eligible for July 15 relief for filing 2019 individual tax returns, extensions, and 2020 individual Section 475 elections.

April 9: IRS Notice 2020-23, dated April 9, states on page 7: “Finally, elections that are made or required to be made on a timely filed Specified Form (or attachment to a Specified Form) shall be timely made if filed on such Specified Form or attachment, as appropriate, on or before July 15, 2020.”

Good news: TTS traders as sole proprietor individuals now have to July 15, 2020, to elect Section 475(f) for 2020, as the 475 MTM election is an attachment to a specified form, either F1040 or F4868. Previously, we recommended TTS traders elect 475 by April 15, 2020, to play it safe.

March 28: On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This bill includes significant economic aid and tax relief provisions. Some tax relief applies retroactively to 2018, 2019, and 2020. See how TTS traders carryback NOLs five tax years for 2018, 2019 and 2020 in our blog post CARES Act Allows 5-Year NOL Carrybacks For Immediate Tax Refunds. If you have massive trading losses in 2020, a timely-filed 475 election is essential for TTS traders this year!

March 25: Our Darren Neuschwander, CPA, communicated with the IRS Chief Counsel’s office for Section 475(f) MTM elections. Mr. Neuschwander asked whether the tax deadline for submitting a 2020 Section 475 election is April 15 or July 15, considering that the IRS delayed the tax-filing deadline to July 15. In our email to the IRS, we gave our rationale for why it should be July 15 (see March 24 update below).

The IRS official told us to watch for an IRS FAQ, which they might add to answer our question, although she gave us no assurances or a timeline.

In the meantime, she highly recommends that those who want to elect 475 MTM for 2020 to file the election statement by attachment to a 2019 tax extension (Form 4868) mailed to the IRS by April 15. That’s what Rev Proc 99-17 requires. The IRS tracks 475 elections with extensions or tax return filings, but not if the taxpayer sends a separate letter with the election. It’s okay if the taxpayer files another extension Form 4868 on July 15 to pay 2019 taxes owed. She reminded us that the IRS does not grant tax relief for late-filed 475 elections.

Therefore, we have been advising clients to make 2020 Section 475 MTM elections on securities and/or commodities by April 15. You can prepare the 2019 tax extension with the 2020 election statement attachment, but wait to file it until the April 15 deadline. Meanwhile, monitor the IRS FAQs and our blog to see if the IRS postpones that deadline as well.

What’s the fuss?
A Section 475 election could be a savior this year with extreme volatility and massive trading losses. Instead of having a capital loss limitation of $3,000, you’ll have unlimited ordinary losses and perhaps a net operating loss (NOL) carryback refund.

Pending stimulus legislation suspends the TCJA business loss limitations, including reauthorizing NOL five-year carrybacks for 2018, 2019, and 2020, and repealing the excess business loss (EBL) restriction. TTS traders with 475 elections would get immediate tax relief. That can replenish your trading account and keep you in business!

March 24: The IRS published FAQs to support Notice 2020-18 for the April 15 tax-deadline postponement to July 15: Filing and Payment Deadlines Questions and Answers. CPA industry groups will likely ask for another round of FAQs to address unanswered questions. It’s important to note that FAQs are not yet “substantial authority,” as tax notices are, and the IRS often changes FAQs at a future date like it recently did with cryptocurrency.

  • Elections: The FAQs don’t mention the word “elections,” including the Section 475 election for TTS traders. The Section 475 MTM election wording comes directly from Rev Proc 99-17, which states:

    “The (election) statement must be filed not later than the due date (without regard to extensions) of the original federal income tax return for the taxable year immediately preceding the election year and must be attached either to that  return or, if applicable, to a request for an extension of time to file that return.”

    In the Notice 2020-18, the IRS moved the due date for 2019 individual tax returns to July 15. The above Q12 allows an automatic extension request on July 15 for more time to file. It seems logical to conclude that a 2020 Section 475 election is due July 15. If the IRS does not explicitly address this question, then a TTS trader with a massive 2020 YTD trading loss might want to file a protective extension request with a 475 election statement attachment by April 15 to play it safe.

March 20: It’s not yet certain if the IRS will accept a 2020 Section 475 election submitted by July 15 in conformity with the postponed tax filing deadline. It would afford traders 90 days of additional hindsight. The IRS promised FAQs soon, which might address “elections.” The original CARES Act bill included moving election deadlines, too. (Update March 23: However, the latest version of the CARES Act bill removed that entire section, perhaps because Treasury already moved the tax deadline to July 15.) If you have a significant Q1 2020 trading loss as a trader eligible for trader tax status (TTS), and you are counting on 475 ordinary loss treatment, then it’s currently safer to file an extension by April 15 and attach a 2020 Section 475 election statement. Stay tuned to our blog posts about the election issue. (See April 15 Tax Deadline Moved To July 15.)

Original blog post, dated Feb. 29, 2020:

With heightened market volatility in Q1 2020, many traders incurred massive losses. TTS traders should consider a 2020 Section 475 election to turn capital losses into ordinary losses. Don’t get stuck with a $3,000 capital loss limitation for 2020 and a considerable capital loss carryover to 2021; unlock immediate tax savings with ordinary-loss deductions against wages and other income this year.

Election procedures: Existing TTS partnerships and S-Corps should attach a 475 election statement to their 2019 entity tax return or extension due March 16, 2020. TTS sole proprietors (individuals) should attach a 475 election statement to their 2019 income tax return or extension due April 15, 2020. The second step is to file a 2020 Form 3115 (Application for Change in Accounting Method) with your 2020 tax return. There are other benefits: 475 trades are exempt from dreaded wash sale loss adjustments, and profitable 475/TTS traders are eligible for the 20% QBI deduction if they are under the QBI taxable income thresholds.

Example 1: A TTS securities trader incurred a capital loss of $103,000 in Q1 2020. He elects Section 475 on securities only by April 15, converting the Q1 capital loss into an ordinary loss on Form 4797 Part II. He also plans to deduct $12,000 of trading business expenses on a Schedule C. He intends to offset the entire trading business loss of $115,000 against a wage income of $175,000 for a gross income of $60,000. Without a 475 election, this trader would have a $3,000 capital loss limitation on Schedule D, a $12,000 ordinary loss on Schedule C, and a gross income of $160,000. He would also have a capital loss carryover to 2021 of $100,000. By deducting the entire $100,000 in 2020 with a 475 election, the trader generates a considerable tax refund.

More about 475
Traders eligible for TTS have the option to make a timely election for the Section 475 accounting method on securities and/or commodities. Section 475 is mark-to-market (MTM) accounting with ordinary gain or loss treatment. MTM imputes sales of open positions at the year-end at market prices. Without MTM, securities traders use the realization (cash) method with capital gains and loss treatment, including wash sale loss adjustments and the annual $3,000 capital loss limitation.

Caution: Sole proprietor (individual) TTS traders who missed the Section 475 MTM election date (April 15, 2019, for 2019) can’t use ordinary-loss treatment for 2019 and are stuck with capital gains and losses and perhaps capital-loss carryovers to 2020. Carefully consider a 475 election for 2020, as you need capital gains to use up capital loss carryovers, and 475 is ordinary income.

A new entity set up after April 15 could deliver Section 475 MTM for the rest of 2020 on trading losses generated in the entity account if it filed an internal Section 475 MTM election within 75 days of inception.

Ordinary losses offset all types of income (wages, portfolio income, and capital gains) on a joint or single filing, whereas capital losses only offset capital gains. Plus, business expenses and ordinary trading losses comprise a net operating loss (NOL) carry forward.

By making a 475 election on securities only, TTS traders retain lower 60/40 capital gains rates on Section 1256 contracts (futures), and they can segregate investment positions for long-term capital gains.

TCJA introduced an excess business loss (EBL) limitation starting in 2018. For 2019, the inflation-adjusted EBL limitation is $510,000/married and $255,000/other taxpayers. The EBL applies to Section 475 ordinary losses and trading expenses. Add an EBL to an NOL carryforward. For example, a single taxpayer with a $300,000 ordinary loss from 475 and trading costs, and no other wage or business income, might have an EBL of $45,000.

TCJA offers a 20% qualified business income (QBI) tax deduction for pass-through businesses, including sole proprietors. TTS trading is a specified service activity. QBI includes 475 ordinary income but excludes capital gains/losses, portfolio income, and forex. TTS expenses are negative QBI. A profitable TTS/475 trader is eligible for the QBI deduction providing their taxable income is not over the QBI thresholds.

Don’t miss the 475 election deadline
Applying for 9100 relief within six months of the 475 election due date by private letter ruling is an expensive process, and it’s likely to fail. Only one trader won this type of relief — Mr. Vines displayed no hindsight and good faith, and he had a perfect set of factors. In PLR 202009013 dated Nov. 15, 2019, the IRS ruled, “Taxpayers are not entitled to § 301.9100 relief to make a late § 475(f)(1) election because Taxpayers did not act reasonably and in good faith and granting relief would prejudice the interests of the Government.”

For more information and a sample 475 election statement, see Green’s 2020 Trader Tax Guide, Chapter 2, on Section 475 MTM.

Darren Neuschwander, CPA, contributed to this blog post.


Uncertainty About Using QBI Tax Treatment For Traders

March 6, 2019 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA | Read it on

See our more recent blog post: A Rationale For Using QBI Tax Treatment For Traders.

Traders in securities and/or commodities, qualifying for trader tax status (TTS) as a sole proprietor, S-Corp, or partnership (including hedge funds), are wondering if they should use “qualified business income” (QBI) tax treatment on their 2018 tax returns. I see a rationale to include such treatment, but there are conflicts and unresolved questions, which renders it uncertain at this time. Section 199A QBI regs include “trading” as a “specified service trade or business” (SSTB), and QBI counts Section 475 ordinary income or loss. However, Section 199A’s interaction with 864(c) may override that and deny QBI tax treatment to U.S. resident traders.

QBI treatment might be an issue for all TTS traders, not just the ones who elected Section 475 ordinary income or loss. For example, a TTS sole proprietor trader filing a Schedule C would report business expenses as a QBI loss, which might reduce aggregate QBI from other activities, thereby reducing an overall QBI deduction. There are QBI loss carryovers, too.

Many TTS traders and hedge funds don’t want QBI tax treatment since they have not elected Section 475, and QBI excludes capital gains, Section 988 forex ordinary income, dividends, and interest income. Hedge fund accountants seem to prefer the Section 864 rationale to not use QBI treatment for TTS funds.

A partnership or S-Corp needs to report QBI items on Schedule K-1 lines for “Other Information,” in box 20 for partnerships and box 17 for S-Corps, including Section 199A income or loss, and related 199A factors like W-2 wages and qualified property.

With uncertainty over QBI tax treatment, traders should file 2018 tax extensions for partnerships and S-Corps by March 15, 2019, and extensions for individuals by April 15, 2019.

A 2019 Section 475 election is due by those extension deadlines. Section 475 gives tax loss insurance: Exemption on wash sale loss adjustments on securities and avoidance of the $3,000 capital loss limitation. There’s a chance traders might be entitled to a QBI deduction on 475 income, so factor that possibility into decision making. (See my recent blog on extensions and 475 elections.)

Section 864 might deny QBI treatment to TTS traders
I took a closer look at the confusing language in Section 199A’s interaction with Section 864(c), which might deny QBI treatment to TTS traders. Section 199A final regs imply that if a trade or business does not constitute “effectively connected income” (ECI) in the hands of a non-resident alien under Section 864(c), then it’s not QBI for a U.S. resident taxpayer operating a domestic trade or business.

Historically, Section 864 applied to nonresident aliens, and foreign entities for determining U.S. source income, including ECI in Section 864(c). Reading Section 864 makes sense with nonresident aliens in mind. However, it gets confusing when 199A overlays language on top of Section 864 for the benefit of determining QBI for U.S. residents.

The function of Section 864 is to show nonresident aliens how to distinguish between U.S.-source income (effectively connected income) vs. foreign-source income. An essential element of Section 199A is to limit a QBI deduction to “domestic trades or businesses,” not foreign ones. 199A also uses the term “qualified trades or business.” It appears the authors of 199A used a modified Section 864 for determining “domestic QBI.”

Section 864 a “trade or business within the U.S.” does not include:
“Section 864(b) — Trade or business within the United States.

Section 864(b)(2) — Trading in securities or commodities.

(A): Stocks and securities.

(i)    In general. Trading in stocks or securities through a resident broker, commission agent, custodian, or other independent agent.

(ii)    Trading for taxpayer’s own account. Trading in stocks or securities for the taxpayer’s own account, whether by the taxpayer or his employees or through a resident broker, commission agent, custodian, or other agent, and whether or not any such employee or agent has discretionary authority to make decisions in effecting the transactions. This clause shall not apply in the case of a dealer in stocks or securities.

(C) Limitation. Subparagraphs (A)(i) and (B)(i) (for commodities) shall apply only if, at no time during the taxable year, the taxpayer has an office or other fixed place of business in the United States through which or by the direction of which the transactions in stocks or securities, or in commodities, as the case may be, are effected.”

Example of (ii) above: A nonresident alien “trades his own account” at a U.S. brokerage firm. The nonresident does not have an office in the U.S., but it doesn’t matter since the 864(b)(2)(C) limitation does not apply to (ii), a trader for his account, it only applies to (i). Although this trader might qualify for TTS, he does not have a “trade or business within the U.S.” and therefore does not have QBI as a nonresident alien.

Notice how Section 199A regs reference Section 864:

“Section 199A(c)(3)(A)(i) provides that for purposes of determining QBI, the term qualified items of income, gain, deduction, and loss means items of income, gain, deduction and loss to the extent such items are effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States (within the meaning of section 864(c), determined by substituting ‘qualified trade or business (within the meaning of section 199A’ for ‘nonresident alien individual or a foreign corporation’ or for ‘a foreign corporation’ each place it appears).”

According to tax publisher Checkpoint, “Effectively connected income-qualified business income defined for purposes of the 2018-2025 pass-through deduction.”

“Income derived from excluded services under Code Sec. 864(b)(1) (performance of personal services for foreign employer, or Code Sec. 864(b)(2) (trading in securities or commodities) can never be effectively connected income in the hands of a nonresident alien.

Code Sec. 864(b)(2) generally treats foreign persons, including partnerships, who are trading in stocks, securities, and in commodities for their own account or through a broker or other independent agent as not engaged in a U.S. trade or business. So, if a trade or business isn’t engaged in a U.S. trade or business by reason of Code Sec. 864(b), items of income, gain, deduction, or loss from that trade or business won’t be included in QBI because those items wouldn’t be effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business.”

In 199A, the first reference to Section 864 is under the heading “Interaction of Sections 875(1) and 199A.”

“Section 875(1) Partnerships; beneficiaries of estates and trusts: (i) a nonresident alien individual or foreign corporation shall be considered as being engaged in a trade or business within the United States if the partnership of which such individual or corporation is a member is so engaged, and (ii) a nonresident alien individual or foreign corporation which is a beneficiary of an estate or trust which is engaged in any trade or business within the United States shall be treated as being engaged in such trade or business within the United States.”

An example of Section 875(1): Consider a U.S. partnership in the consulting business. U.S. residents and nonresident alien investors own it. The Schedule K-1 for partners reports ordinary income on line 1, which according to Section 875(1) is ECI for the nonresident partners. The nonresident alien must file a Form 1040NR to report this ECI, and she might be eligible for a QBI deduction since it’s from a “domestic trade or business,” determined on the entity level.

Conflicts and unresolved questions
Tax writers in 199A regs left conflicts and unresolved questions when it comes to traders in securities and or commodities. Are traders in no man’s land? I’ve asked several of the tax attorneys in IRS Office of Chief Counsel listed in the 199A regs to answer the following question: Are U.S. resident traders in securities and or commodities with trader tax status subject to QBI tax treatment? I am awaiting an answer.

The 199A regs state:

“The trade or business of the performance of services that consist of investing and investment management, trading, or dealing in securities (as defined in section 475(c)(2))…

(xii) Meaning of the provision of services in trading. For purposes of section 199A(d)(2) and paragraph (b)(1)(xi) of this section only, the performance of services that consist of trading means a trade or business of trading in securities (as defined in section 475(c)(2)), commodities (as defined in section 475(e)(2)), or partnership interests. Whether a person is a trader in securities, commodities, or partnership interests is determined by taking into account all relevant facts and circumstances, including the source and type of profit that is associated with engaging in the activity regardless of whether that person trades for the person’s own account, for the account of others, or any combination thereof.”

Section 199A regs define “trading” as a “specified service trade or business” (SSTB). The regs focus on “performance of services,” which relates to a proprietary trader performing trading services to a prop trading firm and issued a 1099-Misc as an independent contractor. Some tax advisors had suggested that hedge funds don’t perform trading services; their management companies do. That may be why tax writers added “trading for your own account.”

The million-dollar question is “Why define TTS trading as an SSTB unless the tax writers intended QBI treatment for that SSTB?

Only a Section 475 election can generate QBI income for a trading SSTB (or QBI losses, if incurred). The 199A final regs added Section 475 to QBI. This combination of SSTB and 475 income would make a trader eligible for a QBI deduction. Others could argue 475 was added only for dealers in securities and or commodities.

The 199A regs indicate if a trade or business does not constitute “effectively connected income” (ECI) in the hands of a nonresident alien under Section 864(c), then it’s not QBI for a U.S. resident taxpayer, even if operating a domestic trade or business. Is there a loophole in that “trader in securities or commodities” are covered under Section 864(b)(2), not 864(c)?

My partner Darren Neuschwander CPA, and I communicated with leading CPAs, including two big-four tax partners. Those tax partners acknowledged conflicts and uncertainties in QBI treatment for hedge funds and solo TTS traders. The vast majority of larger hedge funds don’t elect Section 475, so those hedge funds would only experience the downside to QBI treatment — QBI losses for investors.

The tax attorneys who drafted TCJA and199A regs may have intended to exclude TTS trading companies including hedge funds from QBI tax treatment because they figured these companies would most likely have QBI losses caused by TTS business expenses. They knew QBI excluded most portfolio income like capital gains, dividends, and interest income so that traders might consider the law unfair. I advocated for TTS trades to have QBI treatment because many solo TTS traders have elected Section 475 and they would get a QBI deduction.

TTS and 475 elections help traders
No matter which way the pendulum swings on QBI treatment for traders, I still recommend trader tax status for deducting business expenses, and a TTS S-Corp for health insurance and retirement plan deductions. There are always the tax loss insurance benefits in Section 475. (See Traders Elect Section 475 For Massive Tax Savings.)

Darren L. Neuschwander CPA, and Roger Lorence JD contributed to this blog post.


Traders Elect Section 475 For Massive Tax Savings

February 21, 2019 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA | Read it on

If you are a securities trader eligible for trader tax status (TTS), consider making a timely Section 475 election for 2019. Section 475 means you’ll avoid wash sales and the capital loss limitation. You might also become eligible for the 20% qualified business income deduction, although QBI treatment is currently uncertain for TTS traders.

Historically, the chief tax benefit of Section 475 was deducting trading losses without limits. Section 475 trades are exempt from onerous wash sale loss adjustments on securities, which can trigger a tax bill on phantom income at year-end. Section 475 ordinary losses are not capital losses, which means the puny $3,000 capital loss limitation doesn’t apply.

Example 1: A sole proprietor TTS trader incurred a trading loss of $30,000 in 2018. He elected Section 475 for 2018 by April 17, 2018, and reported it as an ordinary loss on Form 4797 Part II. He also deducted $10,000 of trading business expenses on a Schedule C. He offsets the entire trading business loss of $40,000 against wage income of $100,000 for a gross income of $60,000. That generates a significant tax refund. Without a 475 election, this trader would have a $3,000 capital loss limitation on Schedule D, a $10,000 ordinary loss on Schedule C, and a gross income of $87,000. He would also have a capital loss carryover of $27,000.

Example 2: The markets dropped in December 2018, and many traders incurred significant capital losses. Markets rallied back in January 2019, and many of traders repurchased positions they sold for losses in December. They didn’t wait 31 days, so they triggered wash sale loss adjustments at year-end 2018. It caused many to owe significant capital gains taxes on phantom income. The deferred WS cost basis might cause some traders to have substantial capital losses in 2019, well above the capital loss limitation. A double whammy. A 475 election for 2019 can convert 2019 capital losses into ordinary losses. It doesn’t fix 2018 but helps a lot in 2019.

With the advent of the new tax law TCJA and 199A regs, TTS traders might derive an essential tax benefit from Section 475 ordinary income. TCJA introduced a 20% qualified business income (QBI) deduction, and QBI includes Section 475 ordinary income or loss but excludes capital gains and losses, forex Section 988 and swap contract ordinary income, dividends and interest income. Trading is a “specified service trade or business” (SSTB), which means the QBI deduction is disallowed if the individual’s taxable income exceeds the 2019 income cap of $421,400/$210,700 (married/other taxpayers). However, QBI tax treatment is uncertain because of 199A references to Section 864(c), which seem to deny the QBI treatment for TTS traders. There are conflicts and unresolved questions for traders in 199A, so stay tuned. (See Uncertainty About Using QBI Tax Treatment For Traders.)

Excerpt from Green’s 2019 Trader Tax Guide
By default, securities and Section 1256 investors are stuck with capital-loss treatment, meaning they’re limited to a $3,000 net capital loss against ordinary income. The problem is that their trading losses may be much higher and not useful as a tax deduction in the current tax year. Capital losses first offset capital gains in full without restriction. After the $3,000 loss limitation against other income is applied, the rest is carried over to the following tax years. Many traders wind up with little money to trade and unused capital losses. It can take many years to use up their capital loss carryovers. What an unfortunate waste! Why not get tax savings from using Section 475 MTM right away?

Business traders qualifying for TTS have the option to elect Section 475 MTM accounting with ordinary gain or loss treatment in a timely fashion. When traders have negative taxable income generated from business losses, Section 475 accounting classifies them as net operating losses (NOLs). Caution: Individual business traders who miss the Section 475 MTM election date (April 15, 2019, for 2019) can’t claim business ordinary-loss treatment for 2019 and will be stuck with capital-loss carryovers.

A new entity set up after April 15 can deliver Section 475 MTM for the rest of 2019 on trading losses generated in the entity account if it files an internal Section 475 MTM election within 75 days of inception. This election does not change the character of capital loss treatment on the individual accounts before or after its creation. The entity is meant to be a fix for going forward; it’s not a means to clean up the past problems of capital loss treatment.

Ordinary trading losses can offset all types of income (wages, portfolio income, and capital gains) on a joint or single filing, whereas capital losses only offset capital gains. Plus, business expenses and business ordinary trading losses comprise an NOL, which is carried forward. It doesn’t matter if you are a trader or not in a carryforward year. Business ordinary trading loss treatment is the most significant contributor to federal and state tax refunds for traders.

Starting in 2018, TCJA repealed the two-year NOL carryback, except for certain farming losses and casualty and disaster insurance companies. This means NOLs are carried forward indefinitely, and the deduction of 2018 and subsequent-year NOLs are limited to 80% of taxable income. TCJA also introduced a new excess business loss (EBL) limitation of $500,000 married and $250,000 for other taxpayers. Add EBL to an NOL carryforward.

Section 475 ordinary losses reduce net investment income for calculating the 3.8% Obamacare net investment tax.

There are many nuances and misconceptions about Section 475 MTM, and it’s essential to learn the rules. For example, taxpayers are entitled to contemporaneously segregate investment positions that aren’t subject to Section 475 MTM treatment, meaning at year-end, they can defer unrealized gains on properly segregated investments. Taxpayers can have the best of both worlds — ordinary tax losses on business trading and deferral with lower long-term capital gains tax rates on segregated investment positions. We generally recommend electing Section 475 on securities only to retain lower 60/40 capital gains rates on Section 1256 contracts. Far too many accountants and traders confuse TTS and Section 475; they are two different things, yet very connected.

Section 475 election procedures
Section 475 MTM is optional with TTS. Existing taxpayer individuals that qualify for TTS and want Section 475 must file a 2019 Section 475 election statement with their 2018 tax return or extension by April 15, 2019. Existing partnerships and S-Corps file in the same manner by March 15, 2019.

Election statement. “Under Section 475(f), the Taxpayer elects to adopt the mark-to-market method of accounting for the tax year ending Dec. 31, 2019, and subsequent tax years. The election applies to the following trade or business: Trader in Securities as a sole proprietor (for securities only and not commodities/Section 1256 contracts).”

Form 3115 filing. Don’t forget an essential second step: Existing taxpayers complete the election process by filing a Form 3115 (change of accounting method) with the election-year tax return. (I cover the Section 481(a) adjustment in the guide.)

The Section 475 election procedure is different for new taxpayers like a new entity. Within 75 days of inception, a new taxpayer may file the Section 475 election statement internally in its records. The new entity does not have to submit a Form 3115 because it’s adopting Section 475 from inception, rather than changing its accounting method.

If you have a significant capital loss carryover going into 2019, you might want to wait on making a 475 election since you will need capital gains to use it up. (I cover this decision-making and related 475 strategies in my tax guide.)

For more in-depth information on Section 475, see Green’s 2019 Trader Tax Guide Chapter 2.

I revised this blog post on March 5, 2019, in conjunction with my new blog post Uncertainty About Using QBI Tax Treatment For Traders

 


Hope For Active Crypto Traders With Massive Losses

June 16, 2018 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA | Read it on

The AICPA recently asked the IRS to permit cryptocurrency traders, eligible for trader tax status (TTS), to use a Section 475 MTM election on securities and commodities providing for ordinary gain or loss treatment.

In my March 2018 blog post Cryptocurrencies: Trader Tax Status Benefits And Section 475 Issues, I suggested crypto TTS traders consider filing a protective 2018 Section 475 election on securities and commodities, due by April 17, 2018, in case the IRS allowed it. Many crypto traders had significant losses in early 2018 with the market correction, and with a 475 election, they might avoid the $3,000 capital loss limitation using ordinary loss treatment. I said it hinged on whether the IRS changed its designation of crypto from intangible property to a security or a commodity.

The AICPA letter* implied that the IRS could keep its current classification of crypto as intangible property, yet still permit the use of Section 475.  However, it does raise other questions: The AICPA letter did not distinguish between securities and commodities, whereas, Section 475 does. TTS traders may elect Section 475 on securities only, commodities only, or both, and that has other tax implications.

If the IRS considers crypto a security, then Section 1091 wash-sale loss rules for securities would apply. Wash-sale loss adjustments are a headache and can be costly. (If you buy back a losing trade 30 days before or after, you must defer the wash-sale loss to the replacement position’s cost basis.) As intangible property, crypto is not currently subject to wash-sale losses. A Section 475 election on securities exempts TTS traders from making wash-sale loss adjustments.

If the IRS considers crypto a commodity, then a TTS trader should be able to elect Section 475 on commodities. However, that election has other tax consequences: If you trade Section 1256 contracts, including futures, you will surrender the lower 60/40 capital gains rates on 1256 contracts. For that reason, most traders elect Section 475 on securities only.

AICPA letter excerpt
8. Traders and Dealers of Virtual Currency

“Overview: Taxpayers considered dealers and traders who engage in buying and selling securities in the ordinary course of business to customers may make a ‘mark-to-market’ election under section 475. This election recognizes ordinary gains or losses on the deemed sales involved in the mark-to-market process. The securities holdings on the last day of the year are deemed as sold for their fair market value resulting in both ordinary income and ordinary expenses the same as for any other trade or business. Taxpayers who trade virtual currencies perform this activity on virtual currency exchanges that contain all the robust trading features available on trading platforms for securities and commodities, including the same level of liquidity. In this context, virtual currencies are akin to securities and commodities. This particular issue is also under consideration by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Suggested FAQ
Q-22: May taxpayers who trade virtual currency elect the mark-to-market rules under section 475 if they otherwise qualify as a dealer or trader?

A-22: Yes. The nature of virtual currency trading is akin to dealers and traders of securities and commodities and a taxpayer may elect mark-to-market treatment. The taxpayer must otherwise qualify as a dealer or trader in order to make the election.

* The IRS has made no indication that they intend to adopt all, or any, of the many excellent recommendations from the AICPA.

SEC update
On June 14, CNBC reported, “The SEC’s point man on cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings (ICOs) says that bitcoin and ether are not securities but that many, but not all, ICOs are securities and will come under the regulatory control of the SEC and relevant securities laws.”

The official explained what constitutes a security in the eyes of the SEC. An initial coin offering is likely a security because a third-party company, which is not decentralized ownership, sells an investment product to the public. The sponsor uses the money raised for its internal use. The buyer/investor expects a profit — a return on the investment. Conversely, bitcoin and ether are likely not securities because there was no ICO, ownership is decentralized, and they were not sold as investments.


Consider 475 Election By Tax Deadline To Save Thousands

February 27, 2018 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA | Read it on

Traders, eligible for trader tax status, should consider attaching a 2018 Section 475 election statement to their 2017 tax return or extension due by April 17, 2018, for individuals, or by March 15 for partnerships and S-Corps. Section 475 turns capital gains and losses into ordinary gains and losses thereby avoiding the capital loss limitation and wash sale loss adjustments (tax loss insurance). There are benefits to 475 income, too.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ushered in a new 20% pass-through deduction on qualified business income, which likely includes Section 475 ordinary income, but excludes capital gains. Trading is a specified service activity, requiring the owner have taxable income under a threshold of $315,000 married or $157,500 for other taxpayers. There is a phase-out range above the limit of $100,000 married and $50,000 other taxpayers. (See How Traders Can Get The 20% QBI Deduction Under New Law.)

Ordinary losses are better than capital losses
The most significant problem for investors and traders occurs when they’re unable to deduct trading losses on tax returns, significantly increasing tax bills or missing opportunities for tax refunds. Investors are stuck with this problem, but business traders with trader tax status (TTS) can avoid it by filing timely elections for business ordinary tax-loss treatment: Section 475 mark-to-market (MTM) for securities and/or commodities.

By default, securities and Section 1256 investors are stuck with capital-loss treatment, meaning they’re limited to a $3,000 net capital loss against ordinary income. The problem is that their trading losses may be much higher and not used as a tax deduction in the current tax year. Capital losses first offset capital gains in full without restriction. After the $3,000 loss limitation against other income is applied, the rest is carried over to the following tax years. Many traders wind up with little money to trade and unused capital losses. It can take a lifetime to use up their capital loss carryovers. What an unfortunate waste! Why not get a tax refund from using Section 475 MTM right away?

Business traders qualifying for TTS have the option to elect Section 475 MTM accounting with ordinary gain or loss treatment in a timely fashion. When traders have negative taxable income generated from business losses, Section 475 accounting classifies them as net operating losses (NOLs). Caution: Individual business traders who miss the Section 475 MTM election date (April 15 for the current tax year) can’t claim business ordinary-loss treatment for the current tax year and will be stuck with capital-loss carryovers.

A new entity set up after April 15 can deliver Section 475 MTM for the rest of the current tax year on trading losses generated in the entity account if it files an internal Section 475 MTM election within 75 days of inception. This election does not change the character of capital loss treatment on the individual accounts before or after its creation. The entity is meant to be a fix for going forward; it’s not a means to clean up the past problems of capital loss treatment.

Ordinary trading losses can offset all types of income (wages, portfolio income, and capital gains) on a joint filing, whereas capital losses only offset capital gains. Plus, business expenses and business ordinary trading losses comprise an NOL, which can be carried back two tax years and/or forward 20 tax years (for 2017). It doesn’t matter if you are a trader or not in a carryback or carryforward year. Business ordinary trading loss treatment is the most significant contributor to federal and state tax refunds for traders.

Starting in 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act repealed the two-year NOL carryback, except for certain farming losses and casualty and disaster insurance companies. NOLs are carried forward indefinitely, and 2018 and subsequent-year NOLs are limited to 80% of taxable income.

There are many nuances and misconceptions about Section 475 MTM, and it’s essential to learn the rules. For example, you’re entitled to contemporaneously segregate investment positions that aren’t subject to Section 475 MTM treatment, meaning at year-end, you can defer unrealized gains on adequately segregated investments. You can have the best of both worlds — ordinary tax losses on business trading and deferral with lower long-term capital gains tax rates on segregated investment positions. I recommend electing Section 475 on securities only, to retain lower 60/40 capital gains rates on Section 1256 contracts. Far too many accountants and traders confuse TTS and Section 475; they are two different things, yet very connected.

Mark-to-market accounting
Section 475 MTM reports year-end unrealized gains and losses. Marked-to-market means you must impute sales for all open trading business positions at year-end using year-end prices. Many traders have no open business positions at year-end, anyway. You’re reporting realized and unrealized gains and losses, similar to Section 1256 which has MTM built in by default – but don’t confuse Section 1256 with Section 475.

It’s entirely different with Section 1256 contracts where the tax-loss insurance premium is expensive. Electing Section 475 on Section 1256 means you give up the lower Section 1256 60/40 tax rates in exchange for ordinary income rates. There are more nuances to consider as well.

Suitable for securities traders
I coined the term “tax-loss insurance” for Section 475 because if your trading house burns down, you can deduct Section 475 trading losses right away and get a huge tax break (refund or lower tax bill). It’s a free insurance premium on securities because short-term capital gains use ordinary tax rates in the same manner as Section 475 MTM. But, Section 475 losses might generate immediate tax benefits (insurance recovery) whereas capital losses do not.

Securities traders should usually elect Section 475 MTM unless they already have significant capital-loss carryovers. You can’t offset MTM ordinary trading gains with capital-loss carryovers. On the other hand, if a trader generates sizeable new trading losses before April 17, 2018, he or she might prefer to elect Section 475 MTM for 2018 by that sole proprietor election date to have business ordinary-loss treatment retroactive to Jan. 1, 2018. The trader can form a new entity afterward for a “do over” to use capital gains treatment and get back on track with using up capital loss carryovers. Alternatively, the trader can revoke the Section 475 election in the subsequent tax year.

And often not advised for 1256 contracts
Section 1256 contract traders should usually not elect Section 475 to retain the lower 60/40 tax rates. Section 475 would override Section 1256 and subject trading gains to the short-term ordinary tax rate. With Section 1256, 60% of trading gains are considered long-term capital gains — even on day trades — taxed at lower tax rates (up to 20% in 2018), and 40% are short-term capital gains taxed at ordinary tax rates (up to 37% in 2018). The maximum 60/40 blended rate for 2018 is 26.8%, a meaningful 11.2% difference with ordinary rates. There are significant savings throughout the tax brackets.

Investors and business traders may elect to carry back Form 6781 trading losses three tax years, but it’s only applied against Section 1256 contract trading gains on Form 6781, not other types of income.

If you trade Section 1256 contracts and lose a bundle before the election deadline, you may want to elect Section 475, especially if you don’t have the opportunity to carry back Section 1256 contract trading losses against gains in the prior three tax years. Why not take the chance to lock in a sizeable ordinary business loss? You can revoke Section 475 on Section 1256 contracts in the following year by the tax return due date to get back into lower 60/40 tax treatment on Section 1256 contracts.

Exchange-traded notes (ETNs) cannot use Section 475
ETNs are not securities or commodities and are therefore not covered under a Section 475 election. When the VelocityShares Daily Inverse VIX ST ETN (Nasdaq: XIV) significantly dropped in value in early February 2018, during a market correction, many traders incurred substantial trading losses in this and other volatility ETNs. They are dismayed to learn a Section 475 election doesn’t apply to ETNs, and they must use capital loss treatment. ETNs are also not subject to wash sale loss rules for securities.

Cryptocurrencies might be able to use Section 475
Currently, the IRS labels cryptocurrencies (coin) intangible property — not securities or commodities — so that means it likely doesn’t qualify for Section 475 treatment. Many cryptocurrency traders had massive capital gains in 2017, and some of them suffered substantial trading losses in Q1 2018. They would like to use Section 475 ordinary loss treatment for 2018.

Due to recent SEC and CFTC statements calling coin a security and commodity, respectively, I hope the IRS changes its tune. The IRS issued its initial guidance in March 2014, well before regulators made new statements. (Stay tuned for my upcoming blog post “Cryptocurrency traders are eligible for trader tax status benefits.”)

Don’t assume you can deduct trading losses. Unless you are eligible for trader tax status, make a timely Section 475 election, and can use it on the financial products you trade, you might get no immediate tax benefits on capital losses. In 2018, there’s an excellent reason for profitable traders to elect Section 475; the 20% pass-through deduction on qualified business income, which likely includes 475 ordinary income.

This blog post is a modified excerpt from Green’s 2018 Trader Tax Guide. The guide contains information on the Section 475 election procedures, Form 3115, Section 481(a) adjustments, revocation elections, examples for decision-making, and more. There is no room for making errors with a Section 475 election.


Section 481(a) Positive Adjustment Spread Period Changes

May 26, 2016 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA

According to tax research service Thomson Reuters CheckPoint, “Under the new procedures for filing a Form 3115 for tax year 2015 and forward, the four-year spread period generally applicable to a positive Section 481(a) adjustment has been modified as De minimis § 481(a) adjustment amount increased. Under a de minimis provision, positive adjustment may be spread over one year (versus four years) at the taxpayer’s election. The new procedures increases the de minimis threshold to $50,000 from $25,000. The election is made on the new Form 3115 (Rev 12-2015), Part IV, Line 27.”

This means that a trader with a Section 481(a) income adjustment up to $50,000 can elect to report the entire amount of income in the current tax year rather than spread the income over four years. The IRS is probably hoping fewer taxpayers defer income and some may forget to report that income in subsequent tax years. 

According to Green’s 2016 Trader Tax Guide, “Form 3115 (Change in Accounting Method) includes a section for reporting a Section 481(a) adjustment, which is required when a change of accounting is made. The rest of the multi-page Form 3115 relates to tax law and code sections, etc. In the case of changing to Section 475 MTM, a trader’s section 481(a) adjustment is his unrealized business trading gain or loss as of Dec. 31 of the prior tax year. A section 481(a) loss is deductible in full; whereas a gain of more than $25,000 must be prorated over four tax years.” Effective for 2015 tax filings, the $25,000 is changed to $50,000. 

For example: If a trader’s 2015 Section 481(a) adjustment is $40,000, on their 2015 Form 3115 they may elect to report the full income. Conversely, if the income adjustment is $60,000 they would have to spread it over four years reporting $15,000 each year.

Section 475 and Section 481(a) adjustments
When a trader with trader tax status (TTS) elects Section 475 mark-to-market (MTM) ordinary gain or loss treatment, the IRS requires a Section 481(a) adjustment on income tax Form 3115 (Application for Change in Accounting Method) and Form 4797 (Sales of Business Property).

The trader is changing accounting method from the cash method on Dec. 31 to the Section 475 MTM method on Jan. 1. If the trader has open TTS securities positions on Dec. 31 the Section 481(a) adjustment is the unrealized gain or loss on TTS positions on Dec. 31. Gain is a positive adjustment and loss is a negative adjustment. Segregated investment positions in securities are not included in the Section 481(a) adjustment. Section 1256 contracts like futures are already subject to MTM so they also are not included in the 481(a) adjustment.

 


IRS Considering “Freeze And Mark” For Section 475 Election

May 10, 2016 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA

Click to read Green's blog post in Forbes.

Click to read Green’s blog post in Forbes.

According to Tax Notes article “IRS Considering ‘Freeze and Mark’ for Trader Election” dated Jan. 20, 2016, Robert Williams, branch 3 senior counsel, IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Financial Institutions and Products), said he was optimistic, though cautious, that updated Section 475 regulations will come out by June 30, 2016.

The Tax Notes article mentioned a few significant potential changes that would affect traders in making a new Section 475 election. If codified by the IRS, I expect these changes won’t apply retroactively, so traders who made a 2016 Section 475 election by April 18 should not be affected.

Clarification of the character of income or loss of a Section 481(a) adjustment: The IRS may clarify that it’s a capital gain or loss, rather than an ordinary income or loss, which is the current interpretation. Many traders have benefited from ordinary loss treatment, especially when a Section 481(a) adjustment included wash sale loss deferrals on open trading business positions.

No election deadline: The changes may allow existing taxpayers to make a new Section 475 election throughout the tax year. Currently,  the election deadline is April 15 for existing partnerships and individuals and March 15 for S-Corps. Many existing taxpayers will appreciate doing away with the deadline.

No retroactive application: Williams discussed applying ordinary income or loss treatment on the election date and going forward, and doing away with retroactive application of ordinary income or loss to Jan. 1.

Under current law, when a trader elected Section 475 by April 18, 2016 for 2016 (normally April 15), the election was retroactive to Jan. 1, 2016, so all 2016 trading gains and losses are ordinary income and loss. If a trader qualified for trader tax status (TTS) at year-end 2015, he also makes a Section 481(a) adjustment on Jan. 1, 2016 for unrealized gains or losses on open trading positions on Dec. 31, 2015.

Traders have been able to use hindsight between Jan. 1 and April 15 to make a last-minute decision about electing Section 475. For example, if they have a large trading loss in Q1, they may elect Section 475 to lock in ordinary loss treatment for that loss, and plan to revoke Section 475 in the subsequent year to get back to capital gains treatment to use up capital loss carryovers. That type of hindsight may be lost with these potential updates in the law.

 

 


Safeguard Use Of Section 475 By Trading In An Entity

| By: Robert A. Green, CPA

Section 475 “tax loss insurance” is a fantastic tax benefit for active securities traders qualifying for trader tax status (TTS). Many individual taxpayers have been using it successfully for years. I’ve exhorted the benefits since 1997, when Congress enacted Section 475 tax law for traders.

Some Section 475 provisions are vague
Increasingly, my firm’s tax compliance CPAs have noticed problems with the nuances of Section 475, including some of the rule sections, which are too vague. The IRS acknowledged this with its “Section 475 Clean Up Project” and read our comment letter to the IRS. The IRS said the project is being completed and to expect updated Section 475 regulations in the summer of 2016. (I cover the changes being discussed at tax attorney conferences in my next blog post IRS Considering “Freeze and Mark” for Section 475 Election.)

One of the problems with Section 475 regulations has to do with segregation of investments. Segregation should be done in form and substance and that can be confusing. A prior IRS proposed regulation called for designation of investment accounts, but that was not sufficient as traders could use substance to trump form.

This problem arises when a trader uses Section 475 and also holds investment positions in substantially identical positions. Traders can’t elect Section 475 by account. The law makes the election by taxpayer identification number, which means the election applies to all active trading accounts and investment accounts containing active trading.

Traders can solve this problem by housing the trading business using Section 475 in a separate legal entity and holding investments in individual accounts. This is the only way to fully segregate investments from trading. (Read my recent blog post Active Traders Should Consider An Entity For Tax Savings for other reasons to form an entity.)

Misidentified investment positions
Many individuals trade substantially identical positions between Section 475 active trading accounts and taxable investment accounts, including joint and spousal accounts. For example, they trade Apple options in a Section 475 account and also hold Apple equity in segregated investment accounts.

The IRS can view this trading as gaming the system, with the trader deducting ordinary losses on Apple options but deferring taxes on unrealized long-term capital gains in Apple equity held as an investment. Because Apple options and Apple equity are substantially identical positions, the IRS has the power in Section 475 regulations to treat either the Apple options or the Apple equity as “misidentified investment positions,” which means it can apply Section 475(d)(2). (Learn more about that Section 475 penalty in my blog post IRS Plays Havoc with Traders Misidentifying Investments.)

Experienced trader tax preparers and IRS agents may seek other ways to address this problem, including reclassifying Section 475 ordinary losses on Apple options as investment capital losses, which then triggers capital loss limitations and wash sale loss adjustments on substantially identical positions across all accounts. Or if it’s better for the IRS position, reclassifying Apple equity investments as Section 475 trades, triggering Section 475 MTM ordinary income treatment, thereby losing tax deferral and missing out on lower long-term capital gains rates on realization.

An entity solves the problem
Traders can avoid this problem by ring-fencing Section 475 trades in separate entity accounts and holding investments in individual accounts. A separate legal entity has a different taxpayer identification number vs. an individual taxpayer social security number.

Don’t transfer investment positions into the entity, as that brings the same problem to the entity-level: having trading and investment accounts and or positions on the same taxpayer identification number.

I suggest that traders using portfolio margining on investment positions make the following decision. Either bring investments into the trading entity for portfolio margining and don’t elect Section 475 in the entity or leave the investments out of the entity and elect Section 475.

A newly formed entity may elect Section 475 by placing a resolution in its own books and records within 75 days of inception. Existing taxpayers must elect Section 475 by making an election statement with the IRS by the due date of the prior year tax return, and later file a timely Form 3115 for the year of the election. (Read my blog post Traders: Consider Ordinary Loss Election By Tax Deadline for more details on making the election.)

IRS scrutinizes individuals with large Section 475-related NOL tax refunds
It’s been over a decade since Chen vs. Commission (2004), but an IRS official recently reiterated the importance of that landmark tax court case, deeming similar cases “Chen cases.”

The IRS official was referring to sole proprietor (individual) traders reporting large Schedule C and Form 4797 (Section 475) ordinary losses on individual tax returns and filing for large NOL carryback refunds claims with the IRS. All the cases in my Green’s 2016 Trader Tax Guide, including Assaderaghi, Nelson, Endicott and Holsinger are similar: individuals with Schedule C and Form 4797 losses.

It’s much better to file as an entity trader with Section 475 ordinary loss treatment. The tax refund is the same, but you substantially reduce your chances of IRS exam and denial of TTS, which is required for use of Section 475.

Section 475 tax benefits
Securities traders qualifying for TTS benefit from a Section 475 election. Section 475 securities trades are exempt from wash sale loss adjustments and a capital loss limitation. Section 475 has business ordinary loss treatment, which offsets income of any kind and contributes to net operating losses (NOLs), which may be carried back two years and/or forward 20 years. Short-term capital gains and Section 475 MTM gains are taxed at the ordinary tax rate, so Section 475 is recommended for securities traders.

Conversely, Section 1256 contract traders (futures and more) generally don’t want Section 475 since they would lose lower 60/40 capital gains tax rates in Section 1256 (60% is a long-term capital gain taxed at lower rates and 40% is a short-term capital gain).

Traders can elect Section 475 on securities only, retaining Section 1256 treatment on futures. Section 475 does not apply to segregated investments. Traders value ordinary loss treatment: It’s free tax loss insurance for securities traders.

I’ve been advising traders on tax matters for over 30 years and I’ve seen many ups and downs in the financial markets. I’ve seen professional traders with wide fluctuations of income and loss, too. It’s important to avoid the dreaded $3,000 capital loss limitation against other income and benefit from Section 475 ordinary business loss treatment to generate immediate tax refund relief.

 

 


Traders: Consider Ordinary Loss Election By Tax Deadline

March 22, 2016 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA

Click to read Green's blog post in Forbes.

Click to read Green’s blog post in Forbes.

Traders who qualify for trader tax status (TTS) and have a large trading loss in 2016 should consider filing a 2016 Section 475 MTM (ordinary loss treatment) election statement with their extension or return by the April 18, 2016 due date. Section 475 exempts traders from the capital loss limitation and wash sale loss rules. It’s too late to elect Section 475 for 2015: that election was due last April 15, 2015.

Section 475 allows a choice: an election on securities only, Section 1256 contracts only, or both. Specify such in the election statement. Only traders who qualify for trader tax status may use Section 475 and it applies to active trading in that business activity as a sole proprietor individual or on the entity level. Section 475 doesn’t apply to segregated investment positions, so traders may use long-term capital gains benefits on investments.

The biggest problem for investors and traders occurs when they’re unable to deduct trading losses on tax returns, significantly increasing tax bills or missing opportunities for tax refunds. Investors are stuck with this problem, but business traders with TTS can avoid it by filing timely elections for business ordinary tax-loss treatment: Section 475 mark-to-market (MTM) for securities and/or Section 1256 contracts if elected. (Section 1256 contracts include futures, broad-based indexes, options on futures, options on broad-based indexes and several other instruments.)

By default, securities and Section 1256 investors are stuck with capital-loss treatment, meaning they’re limited to a $3,000 net capital loss against ordinary income. The problem is that their trading losses may be much higher and not useful as a tax deduction in the current tax year. Capital losses first offset capital gains in full without restriction. After the $3,000 loss limitation against other income is applied, the rest is carried over to the following tax years. Many traders wind up with little money to trade and unused capital losses. It can take a lifetime to use up their capital loss carryovers. What an unfortunate waste! Why not get a tax refund from using Section 475 MTM right away?

Business traders qualifying for TTS have the option to elect Section 475 MTM accounting with ordinary gain or loss treatment in a timely fashion. When traders have negative taxable income generated from business losses, Section 475 accounting classifies them as net operating losses (NOLs). Caution: Individual business traders who miss the Section 475 MTM election date (April 18 for 2016) can’t claim business ordinary-loss treatment on trading losses for the current tax year. They will be stuck with capital-loss carryovers.

A new entity set up after April 18, 2016 can deliver Section 475 MTM for the rest of 2016 on trading losses generated in the entity account if the entity files an internal Section 475 MTM election within 75 days of inception. The new entity using Section 475 does not change the character of capital loss treatment on the individual accounts before or after entity inception. The entity is meant to be a fix for going forward; it’s not a means to clean up the past problems of capital loss treatment.

Ordinary trading losses can offset all types of income (wages, portfolio income, and capital gains) for you and your spouse on a joint filing, whereas capital losses only offset capital gains. Plus, business expenses and business ordinary trading losses comprise a NOL, which can be carried back two tax years and/or forward 20 tax years. It doesn’t matter if you are a trader or not in a carryback or carryforward year. Business ordinary trading loss treatment is the biggest contributor to federal and state tax refunds for traders.

There are many nuances and misconceptions about Section 475 MTM, and it’s important to learn the rules. For example, you’re entitled to contemporaneously segregate investment positions that aren’t subject to Section 475 MTM treatment, meaning at year-end you can defer unrealized gains on properly segregated investments. You can have the best of both worlds — ordinary tax losses on business trading and deferral with lower long-term capital gains tax rates on segregated investment positions. We generally recommend electing Section 475 on securities only, so you retain lower 60/40 capital gains rates on Section 1256 contracts. Far too many accountants and traders confuse TTS and Section 475; they are two different things, yet very connected.

Section 475 Election Procedures
Section 475 MTM is optional with TTS. Existing taxpayer individuals and partnerships that qualify for TTS and want Section 475 must file a 2016 Section 475 election statement with their 2015 tax return or extension by April 18, 2016 (April 19, 2016 if you live in Maine or Massachusetts). Existing S-Corps file in the same manner by March 15, 2016.

Election statement. The MTM election statement is one simple paragraph; unfortunately the IRS hasn’t created a tax form for it. It’s a version of the following: “Pursuant to Section 475(f), the Taxpayer hereby elects to adopt the mark-to-market method of accounting for the tax year ended Dec. 31, 2016 and subsequent tax years. The election applies to the following trade or business: Trader in Securities as a sole proprietor (for securities only and not Section 1256 contracts).” If you expect to have a loss in trading Section 1256 contracts, you can modify the parenthetical reference to say “for securities and Section 1256 contracts.” But remember, you’ll give up the lower 60/40 tax rates on Section 1256 contracts. If you trade in an entity, delete “as a sole proprietor” in the statement.

Form 3115 filing. Don’t forget an important second step: Existing taxpayers complete the election process by filing a Form 3115 (change of accounting method) with the election-year tax return. A 2016 MTM election filed by April 18, 2016 is reported and perfected on a 2016 Form 3115 filed with your 2016 tax returns in 2017 – by the due date of the return including extensions. Many accountants and taxpayers confuse this two-step procedure and they file the Form 3115 as step one on the election statement date. The IRS usually sends back the Form 3115, which can jeopardize ordinary-loss treatment.

Key strategy
If you have an individual $50,000 capital-loss carryover going into 2016, and you lose $50,000 in Q1 2016, it’s probably wise to elect Section 475 MTM as a sole proprietor for business ordinary loss treatment — and related tax relief — rather than digging a bigger hole of unutilized capital losses.

You can form a new entity for a “do over” to get back to capital gains treatment, so you can use up your capital loss carryovers. You have 75 days of additional hindsight once the entity commences business to file an internal Section 475 MTM election resolution for the entity trading. You’re hoping to generate capital gains in the entity to use up your remaining capital-loss carryovers and put off the Section 475 MTM election to the following entity year.

For more information on Section 475 and trader tax status, read Green’s 2016 Trader Tax Guide.

 


IRS Plays Havoc With Traders Misidentifying Investments

November 23, 2015 | By: Robert A. Green, CPA

Click to read Green's blog post

Click to read Green’s blog post

The IRS and some states have been playing havoc with traders in exams, claiming traders did not properly comply with Section 475 rules for segregation of investment positions from trading positions. Noncompliance gives the agent license to drag misidentified investment positions into Section 475 mark-to-market (MTM), or to boot misidentified trading losses out of Section 475 into capital loss treatment subject to the $3,000 capital loss limitation. Both of these types of exam changes cause huge tax bills, penalties and interest.

Traders don’t want to lose capital gains deferral and lower long-term capital gains rates on investment positions in securities. With misidentified investments the IRS has the power to drag those positions into Section 475 subjecting them to MTM and ordinary income tax rates.

Section 475 improper identification
Section 475 contains a clause to limit unrealized losses on investment positions dragged into Section 475. Under Section 475(d)(2) (which is applicable to traders pursuant to Section 475(f)(1)(D)), if a security was misidentified as an investment, then there is Section 475 MTM unrealized loss recognition only against other Section 475 gains, and any excess unrealized losses are deferred until the security is actually sold. Limiting MTM treatment on unrealized losses on investment positions is not much different from unrealized capital losses on those same positions.

Carefully identify investments
If you claim trader tax status and use Section 475 MTM, you can prevent this problem by carefully identifying each investment position on a contemporaneous basis. When you receive confirmation of the purchase of an investment position, email yourself to identify it as investment position as that constitutes a timestamp in your books and records. Don’t hold onto winning Section 475 trading positions and morph them into investment positions, as that does not comply with the rules. If identifying each separate investment is inconvenient, then ring-fence investments into identified investment accounts vs. active trading accounts. Use “Do Not Trade” lists for investing vs. trading accounts so you don’t trade the same symbol in both accounts.

But this compliance is not enough. If you hyperactively trade around your investments, the IRS can say you failed to segregate the investment in substance.

Section 475 clean up project
In 2015, the IRS acknowledged lingering problems with Section 475 and announced a Clean Up Project welcoming comments from tax professionals. I started a successful petition on Rally Congress to fix Section 475 and TTS rules and also sent a cover letter and comments to the IRS. The American Bar Association ABA Comments on Mark-to-Market Rules Under Section 475 are good. See my blog post in Aug. 2014 IRS warns Section 475 traders, which focuses on the segregation of investment issue.

Individuals have a problem
Section 475 misidentification of investments is a huge problem for individual sole proprietor traders who have both trading and investment positions. Section 475 is very valuable since it exempts trades from wash sale loss rules and the $3,000 capital loss limitation allowing full net operating loss (NOL) treatment for losses which generates huge tax refunds. A capital loss limitation is the biggest pitfall for traders.

Individuals often have a few trading accounts and also several investment accounts. Married couples may each have individual accounts, some joint accounts and IRA accounts. They may buy and hold popular equities in investment accounts and then hyperactively trade those same symbols in their designated trading accounts.

Entities navigate around the problem
The simple fix is to form an entity like a single-member or spousal-member LLC with an S-Corp election. Conduct all business trading with Section 475 on securities in those entity accounts. (The entity may elect Section 475 MTM internally within 75 days of inception of the entity.) Trader tax status, business expenses and Section 475 trading gains and losses are reported on the S-Corp tax return.

It’s wise to avoid investment positions in the entity accounts. But some traders want to use portfolio margining, and brokers don’t allow that between individual and entity accounts, so they want to transfer some large investment positions into the entity accounts. That can become a problem for Section 475 segregation of investment rules, especially if you trade the same symbols. Consult a trader tax expert.

Keep investments in your individual investment accounts. The individual and entity accounts are not connected for purposes of Section 475 rules since they’re separate taxpayer identification numbers.

The entity also looks much better in the eyes of the IRS claiming trader tax status and using Section 475 ordinary loss treatment. Plus, an S-Corp trading company can have employee-benefit plan deductions — health insurance and high-deductible Solo 401(k) retirement plan) — whereas a sole proprietor trader may not.

Tax court cases are for individual traders
A senior IRS official stated at an industry conference that the IRS is going after (auditing) “Chen cases,” referring to the landmark Chen tax court case. Chen was a part-time individual trader for just three months and he deducted TTS expenses and a huge Section 475 ordinary loss requesting a huge tax refund. The court denied TTS and use of Section 475.

Other recent trader tax court cases are individual traders claiming large TTS expenses and Section 475 losses. I covered these cases on my blog: see posts for Poppe, Assaderaghi, Nelson, Endicott, Holsinger and Chen (covered in my guides). Some of these traders may have been okay if they used an entity, however many did not qualify for trader tax status, and several botched or lied about electing Section 475.

In my blog post on the Poppe case, I point out that individuals face pitfalls in electing Section 475. The IRS granted Poppe TTS but denied Section 475 ordinary loss treatment because he botched or lied about the Section 475 election and he never filed a Form 3115. A new entity wouldn’t have that problem.

Wash sale losses are similar
Section 1091 wash sale rules are similar, yet different in one important aspect from Section 475 rules. While the entity is a different taxpayer from the individual for wash sale loss purposes, the IRS can apply Section 267 related party transaction rules to connect the entity and individual accounts if the trader purposely tries to avoid wash sale losses between the entity and individual accounts. I have not seen Section 267 mentioned in connection with Section 475 segregation rules.

Bottom line
Section 475 tax loss insurance is a huge tax break for traders who qualify for trader tax status but be careful with properly identifying investments. Be safe on using TTS and Section 475 by trading in an entity. Now is a good time to form one for 2016.


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